Windows Server – Prevent users from changing printer preferences for color

This post is created because I see a lot of demand on the forum to be able to block the color usage of some printers by blocking the user to change the printer preference.

At first I will tell that the driver make a huge difference, any option available in the preference’s windows are available to the user, as they are mapped under the HCU of the user.

Sadly, but necessary to tell it, the easiest way to block that is to buy a printer that got the accounting module in it to be able to ask for a PIN for the color’s usage. The driver is usually wrote to allow the user to enter the PIN when it detect that it’s a color printout. Some model will ask the PIN locally on the touch screen.

Now some workaround:

First, we block the color usage in the printer’s configuration.

Now if we use GPP in example to deploy the printer, please set it to replace. It will replace existing setting at each GPO refresh’s interval. (by default 90 minutes)

Delete and recreate the shared printer connection. The net result of the Replace action overwrites all existing settings associated with the shared printer connection. If the shared printer connection does not exist, then the Replace action creates a new shared printer connection.

We could add the Printer only at each logon too in replace’s mode.

I suggest that GPO below. That will prevent any user to manually add a printer into their computer to bypass our restriction. That will force the user to use published printer. As when the printer got connected the computer, the print driver got pushed, thus it open a door to allow a non-admin user to add the printer.

User Configuration–> Administrative Templates –> Control Panel –> Printers –> Prevent addition of printers –> Enable

Last workaround, block the color usage in the printer itself if you can.

As you can see there is not much tip to prevent the user, but as said it exist some workaround.

 

Thanks

 

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